general

HMS INVINCIBLE

HMS Invincible was the Royal Navy's lead ship of her class og three light aircraft carriers and was launched on 3rd May, 1977 as the seventh ship to carry the name.She took over as flagship of the British fleet when Hermes was sold to India. Invincible was also employed in the Yugoslav Wars and the Second Gulf War. In 2005, she was decommissioned.

 

 

 

 

 

PARISHES

ST NICHOLAS CHURCH, BOARHUNT   

     St Nicholas, the Parish church of Boarhunt, is situated in South Boarhunt and is more than two miles away by road from the centre of its village, North Boarhunt. The church is, like its sister church, St James Without-the-Priory Gate in Southwick, wholly owned and administered by the Southwick Estate under the care of the Squire, Mr Thistlethwayte. Both churches are Donative Lay Peculiars. ‘Donative’ describes the legal ability of the owner, to gift or will property, in this case a church. ‘Peculiar’ is the state of a church exempt from the jurisdiction of the Ordinary (the Bishop), in whose Diocese the churches are. The term ‘Lay’ is used to distinguish the fact that a church is not ‘Royal’. The Squire acts as a ‘Lay Prior’ with the intrinsic authority within the parish to appoint a Chaplain, Vergers and Churchwardens. 

     In 1801 Boarhunt had a population of 133. Even by the standards of the time when settlements were much smaller than they are today it was a little village. Nevertheless by 1901 the population of Boarhunt had more than doubled to just over 300. The largest part of the parish is North Boarhunt which stands about 2 kilometers north of the church. In the early 19th century a monument to Nelson, which stands 150 feet high was erected near Boarhunt. A little school in North Boarhunt opened in 1873.

 

TRAINING GROUND FOR BISHOPS

     Three vicars of St Mary’s Church in Fratton, which has always had a reputation as a training parish, became Bishops, two of them becoming Archbishop. The Revd Cosmo Gordon Laing became Archbishop of Canterbury in 1928 after serving ten years as Archbishop of York. The Revd Cyril Forster Garbett became Archbishop of York in 1942 and served there until 1955. The Third was Frederick Temple who became Bishop of Swindon in 1970 and then Malmesbury in Wiltshire when Swindon was renamed. Both his grandfather Frederick was Archbishop of Canterbury in 1896 and his uncle William (Frederick’s son) was Archbishop at York for 14 years and then Canterbury from 1942 to 1944 when he sadly died.
     All the registers for St Mary’s are available on CD from us and in the Record Office at Portsmouth and it is interesting to note the large turnover in the number of clergy, sometimes 11 in a year, whose names appear in great regularity over the years.

 

HAYLINGS LOSS - ISLE OF WIGHT GAIN

     In May, 1996 Portsmouth-based brewers Brickwoods opened the uniquely named Hayling Billy public House on Hayling Island. The interior was designed like carriage furnishings and Brickwoods carried on the theme by purchasing a redundant Terrier steam locomotive from its last active location on the Meon Valley Line to be installed in the car park. Repainted in its original livery, it was given its original name of Lewington. Several years later, with the sellout of Brickwoods to brewing giant Whitbread, the Newington was given to the Haven Street Railway on the Isle of Wight in a livery of Southern Railway green, where it was renamed Freshwater.

 

THE WHITE HART

Legend has it that King Henry VII was hunting in the New Forest when his party surprised a particularly magnificent white deer. Women in the hunting party pleaded for the animal's life and the king agreed, and even invested the beast with a golden collar. The story is recounted by the countless pubs all over the country called The White Hart.

 

HMS CAMPANIA SAILS INTO

SOUTHAMPTON

Sixty-six years ago Southampton celebrated the 1951 Festival of Britain with the arrival in port of a unique vessel. HMS Campania, which was designated as the "festival ship", was a Second World War aircraft carrier,which had been turned into a floating exhibition centre. Up to 2,000 visitors at a time could see open-air exhibits, demonstrations and sports displays

 

information

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OPEN MEETINGS

Because of the current virus situation, we are unfortunately closed. Please watch this page for further details 

 

FREE WiFi - FREE PARKING

 

THE NUMBER OF VISITORS TO OUR WEBSITE IN THE PAST WEEK

was 6,561

and has now reached 7,372,610

Total updated 30th November, 2020

 

 

THE DREADED PANDEMIC

     As we are having problems as above, this our main webside has been updated irregularly recently owing to the difficulties in putting the page together because of research limitations. We do apologise for this, but until the current restrictions are lifted we cannot update to our usual fortnightlt pattern. We are looking towards January, 2021.

 

FROM THE PORTSMOUTH NEWS OF 1978

     Mrs Besant, the well-known free-thinker addressed a large audience in July 1878. Asked what had led her to become an atheist, she told the questioner that “the hour was an inconvenient one for her to give them an autobiographical sketch”,
     The curative powers of magnetism fascinated Portsmuthians in 1877. A Mr George Baker (a medical electrician) proclaimed that his Magneticon could deal satisfactorily with asthma, liver complaints, constipation, rheumatism, spinal disease, nervous debility and other ailments. The Magneticon came in many forms, including belts, lung invigorators, spine bands and knee caps, It generated electricity without chain-bands or acids, gave no shocks, left no sores, and could even be worn over clothing. Prices ranged from 1s 6d to 63s..

 

DID YOU KNOW?

     Speed of distribution is vital to the success of any newspaper, and the NEWS was the first paper in the world to use hovercraft to get its latest edition to its readers with a minimum of delay. In July 1933, it used a light aircraft for the first time to take papers to the Isle of Wight during Cowes Week.

 

OCCUPATIONS 

astronomer - Weatherman who assisted mariners here were going on long voyages to try and predict what weather conditions they might encounter.
broom seller - A street salesman with his own distinctive cry, ‘Buy and broom, old shoes buy a broom’. He would accept a pair of old shoes in exchange for a broom, due to the resale value of the leather.
couple beggar - Travelling priest who performed ‘instant’ weddings up to 1754. Also known as a ‘hedge priest’.
crab boiler - Worker associated with the sea fishing industry who boiled crabs and lobsters either for himself or others before selling them on to the public.
forester - A huntsman. In an abbey this was a uniformed position, not just a job. He would live outside the abbey with his own family and would have a range of staff under him. By law, foresters and huntsmen were the only persons allowed to carry bows and arrows in the King’s forests in medieval times.
Luddite - Originally one of a group of factory workers loosely joined in a movement to smash factory machinery which was taking away the jobs of manual workers. Later the term was applied to anyone who refused to take on new ideas or working methods.

 

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