General

HAYLING ISLAND  - SINAH GUN SITE

     To commemorate the 80th anniversary of the Sinah Anti Aircraft Battery Gun site, a wreath was laid on the 18th April to mark the night of a major attack on the island.
During World War II, Hayling Island and Langstone acted as elaborate decoy codenamed ‘Operation Starfish’ to protect Portsmouth and its dockyard.
     Structures in special fire sites were filled with oil and set alight to deceive enemy bomber pilots into thinking that they were bombing Portsmouth and the dockyard.
During the night of the 17th and 18th April 1940, the decoys were employed to great effect. 150 enemy aircraft dropped over 100 tons of parachute mines, high explosive, incendiaries and flares. Despite the ferocity of the attack and under constant fire, the royal artillery gunners that night fires over 2,000 shells and brought down five bombers.
     There were seven Royal Artillery gunners killed during the attack, and their names are recorded on a plaque at the gun site -Bert Hookey, Don Whiteman,

Jack Chandler, Len Ward, Terry Barham,

Jack Mansell, Lieut. Edgar and

Nurse Lazenbeath..

     After the attack, the site was out of action until December 1941.

 

WHAT LINKS ALICE WITH

THE NEW FOREST?

     Alice was a ten-year-old living in Oxford when she asked author Lewis Carroll to entertain her with a story, which eventually evolved into Alice in Wonderland After marrying Reginald Hargreaves at Westmonster Abbey in 1880, she and her new husband moved to Lyndhurst where they lived in a country mansion called Cuffnells.
     Alice died aged 82 in 1934 while staying near her sister’s home in Kent. Her ashes are buried in the graveyard of St Michael and All Angels Church, in Lyndhurst. Cuffnells became a hotel before being requisitioned during the Second World War and used by a searchlight battalion. The house was demolished in the early 1950s.
     Alice and her husband had three sons, two of whom were killed in action during the First World War. They are commemorated on a war memorial in Lyndhurst which was unveiled in April 1921 On the memorial, which is on the site of an outdoor mass held for the soldiers and also marks the spot where they gathered prior to their departure. Lyndhurst was where the “Immortal 7th” Division camped during the First World War before being sent to Ypres. The names of the 68 men are commemorated on the memorial there..

 

Parishes

PORTSEA

     From the early eighteenth century onwards, houses were built outside the fortifications of the old town, The district known as Portsea was the first: it developed its own shopping area and became a community on its own and eventually it was fortified as well as the Dockyard and Old Portsmouth.
     The Lion and Unicorn Gates, which were the two town gates to Portsea survive in new locations. The Lion Gate is incorporated in the semaphore tower that was built in the Dockyard in 1926 and the Unicorn Gate is at the moment one of the principal entrances to HM Dockyard.
     The shipwrights and craftsmen who lived in Portsea objected to walking more than a mile to St Mary’s, the parish church, and they instigated the building of St George’s church in1753. It is a simple square building (as above) which is often compared to a  American colonial church; it was bombed but has been restored.
     Sir Walter Besant, the Victorian novelist, was born ib St George’s Square. His books are not much read today but a hundred years ago they were very popular and his novel By Celia’s Arbour  gives a nostalgic picture of early Victorian Portsea.

 

NOTICE

     The Registrar General has cancelled the registration of Elm Grove Free Church, Elm Grove, Hayling Island as a place of religious worship in accordance with the Marriage Act 1949.

 

NEW FINDMYPAST

Added this month are the Indexes of Deaths of England and Wales 2007 to 2020

Deaths, Northern Ireland 1998 to 2020

 

ANCESTRY

Gloucestershire Church of England Marriages and Banns 1754 to 1938

Non-Conformist Non-parochial Registers for England & Wales 1567 to 1936

England and Wales, Prerogative Court of Canterbury Wills 1384 to 1858

 

HOLY ROOD

     Originally known as ‘Holie Rood’ in the 16th Century, Southampton’s Holy Rood Church, in the High Street, can trace its history back for more than 1,000 years. Stone from Caen in France, was brought to Southampton for use in the construction of the church, which has always been closely linked with ships and seafarers. In earlier times sailors would say prayers in the church before voyages and again on their return to port.

Information

YOU HAVE FOUND

OUR MAIN WEB SITE AND

THERE IS ALSO A SUPPLEMENT

ON FACEBOOK WITH LOTS MORE

PHOTOGRAPHS AND DESCRIPTIONS

 

THE NUMBER OF VISITORS TO OUR WEBSITE IN THE PAST WEEK

was 13,2454

and has now reached 2,857,264

Total updated 3rd May, 2021

 

THE DREADED PANDEMIC

GETTING CLOSER

     As we are still having problems as above but there is hopefully some good news as we are looking towards towards 17th May to re-open our Centre.  We already have permission to do this, but as our research Centre and meetings take place in the undercroft of St Francis church, we are also bound by the dates of religious buildings rules and so these are set to be opened fully on the same day.

     May will be a busy month as we will be completing the changes, as below, with our Facebook  pages joining this main page to widen our scope hisrory and heritage in Havant, Portsmouth and Hampshire in general. ..

 

CHANGES UNDERWAY

     Like all our callers to our web site, we dislike chage and so keep them to a minimum. As you will have noticed in the past couple of weeks, we have made some changes but these were forced by the licensing company of the site and we had to adapt to them.. 

     You will see that some items have been moved around a bit and there are even a couple of new pages and we have also re-opened our facebook site which will be available soon.

     If you are like me, the supermarkets are always changing things round so one can't find anything, but our changes are subtle ones, so you should find everything quite easily - we hope!

 

OCCUPATIONS

khan keeper -  Ancient keeper of a plot of land where people could camp for the night. The khans were eventually enclosed with walls and later had a lodging house built upon the land. Khan later developed into the word ‘inn’.
lamp lighter - Man employed to switch street lights on and off in the days of oil, gas and early electricity.
malefactor - A criminal or wrong-doer in the eyes of the state.
offal separator - The word offal, originally meant literally ‘that which falls off’ but came to mean ‘waste’ or ‘left-overs’. |The term was used in many industries including the production of flour. The term in now almost exclusively used in the meat trade.

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