Staunton Park Genealogy Centre

      NEWS and MORE NEWS

 

Steaming ahead

A charity set up by committed volunteers has taken over management of the Hayling Seaside Railway. Following the retirement of the line's owner, Bob Haddock, the new owners are looking forward to a bright future for the railwayline's owners. The trust is a not-for-profit charity set up to keep the trains running.

 

The last one? Thinking about the latest census now in everyone's thoughts, this release may be the last of its kind in our lifetime as the 1931 census was destroyed in a fire and there was not one taken in 1941 as it was in wartime.

 

New Portsmouth records?

An application on 28th March, 2020 has been made to Portsmouth City Council for the approval of premises as a venue for marriages. The applicant is the Groundlings Theatre Trust at 45, Kent Road, Portsmouth PO1 3BT.

 

DNA to help trace ancestors

Descendants of slaves could be able to trace their ancestors thanks to DNA left on the slave ship Clotilda, which sank off the coast of Alabama in July 1860. Researchers have found the wreckage, discovered three years ago, is remarkably well-preserved.

Two-thirds of the Clotilda, which brought 110 slaves from Benin to to the United States, was preserved, including the hold where the captives were transported for 60 days in appalling conditions. DNA could be extracted from casks, bags and barrels stored in the hull. The voyage was the last known to have transported slaves from Africa. The slaves made it ashore and then, it is believed, the captain William Foster set the ship alight to hide evidence of the trip. Although the vessel sank, it was not destroyed. It is hoped that the research team plans to remove sediment from the wood on the wreckage to see what DNS can be extracted.

 

Well I Never!

Family gave 10 brothers to the Great War. A 15-year old soldier who lied about his age to join up shortly after the outbreak of the First World War helped his family to achieve a remarkable record, but never knew it. Pte Stanley Giles, born in 1899, served 300 days on the Western Front with the Royal East Kent Regiment (the Buffs), before his mother was able to get him discharged because he was underage. In joining up, Giles became the youngest of 10 brothers to see active service. Stanley was one of 19 children of James and Alice Giles and were brought up in Canterbury and are the current record holders for the title of the 'most siblings to serve in World War One'.

  

Prohibitive census

Millions of us who had been waiting in anticipation of the 1921 Census to be published, looked towards Findmypast, the only supplier of onllne access and heralded its arrival. But have you lots of money spare? I was dismayed to find that every name searched will cost £2.25 or £3.15. This makes the exercise totally uneconomical, like most people I have hundreds of names in my family trees.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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